Chris Distefano’s Comedy Central Contract Could Be a Game Changer

Chris-DiStefano

Written By Joseph Santiago

Chris-DiStefano

Chris Distefano’s new general deal with Comedy Central could function as a blueprint for future deals for top comedians to aspire to lock.

The agreement with Comedy Central carries a second-hour special, an animated show, an unscripted series along with also the continuation of his Friday night interstitial series Stupid Questions with Chris Distefano, in addition to first look at content created/developed for any Comedy Central platform.

The venture comes after the 34-year-old, New York-based comedian had seven pilots not to make it into the air within the last several years, including a for CBS based on his lifetime together with Chaz Palminteri (A Bronx Tale) playing his dad. He also co-created the former job with How I Met Your Mother founders Carter Bays and Craig Thomas.

“I’m Chrissy Pilots’, okay, AKA’Chrissy One-Season,’ Distefano said. “If I really do get on, if my show does, it is going to get canceled after one season. And it is just what it is. I don’t know how the f*** to make this career work, but listen, I am driving a Lyft right now (he was not ) and being interviewed by you and it’s great.”  Read deadline article one of our favorite writers Denise Petski

Chris was happy with how the show turned out and knows that sometimes those are the breaks.

“The show [was] great, I am really pleased with the pilot and the thing we put out, but it’s only, it did not go, that is how it functions,” Chris said. “Les Moonves was in control of CBS afterward, so it’s like, listen, if you would have only f***ing picked up my show you would have had my father’s protection by means of this scandal, but now you don’t pick up my display, so you have no occupation, brother, because the Distefanos would not help you out.’ Honestly, seriously, looking back at it, I don’t regret anything.”

Despite his passion project not panning out with CBS, his job on the pilot functioned as a valuable learning experience for Chris.

“I learned how to use individuals but also still struggle for what I want,” Distefano said. “I believed a great deal at CBS I was doing exactly what I needed me to do because that would find the show on the atmosphere.

“I heard that I listened to every single word they said and they didn’t pick up my show, so today I’m one-hundred percent dedicated to working well on a staff, but also doing what I need because if the series does not get picked up I can view it and be like,’Well at least each joke that I wanted got, but it just didn’t make it. I’d feel better sleeping at night.”